DirtyMoe: Rootkit Driver

Avast - 

Abstract

In the first post DirtyMoe: Introduction and General Overview of Modularized Malware, we have described one of the complex and sophisticated called DirtyMoe. The main observed roles of the malware are Cryptojacking and DDoS attacks that are still popular. There is no doubt that malware has been released for profit, and all evidence points to Chinese territory. In most cases, the PurpleFox campaign is used to exploit vulnerable systems where the exploit gains the highest privileges and installs the malware via the installer. In short, the installer misuses System Event Notification Service (SENS) for the malware deployment. At the end of the deployment, two processes (workers) execute malicious activities received from well-concealed C&C servers.

As we mentioned in the first post, every good malware must implement a set of protection, anti-forensics, anti-tracking, and anti-debugging techniques. One of the most used techniques for hiding malicious activity is using rootkits. In general, the main goal of the rootkits is to hide itself and other modules of the hosted malware on the kernel layer. The rootkits are potent tools but carry a high risk of being detected because the rootkits work in the kernel-mode, and each critical bug leads

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